A C T I V

T E X T I L E

T E X T I L E

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 1  Introduction

 

We tend to take textiles for granted because they are so pervasive in our lives. From clothing to interiors, to industrial and medical applications, textiles are fundamental to design. Textile media have also resulted in remarkable works of art. We will look at: Fibers and Yarns Structural Design of Textiles Surface Design of Textiles

 

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 2  Yiqing Yin

Yiqing Yin studied at the Ecole Nationale des Arts Décoratifs, Immigrating from China at age 4, tossed between countries, her clothes have often provided her with a point of reference: "Returning to my clothes, was like living once more within my body and my emotions; I was at home." Her aim has been to create a garment that protects and reinforces, being at the same time a second skin and a supple armour. Examining the dynamic potential of pleats, she imagines structures which are never fixed, shapes that are always in mutation. She sculpts the emptiness around the body with, as a common thread, the search for balance and points of rupture between the flowing zones and the sculpted zones. The modernisation of smocking and the elimination of any order of construction, allows her great room for experimentation. She models loose shapes with a staggering structure, whilst at the same time remaining within the limits of patterned designs, confessing her attraction for a method of creation which is intuitive, a sensory wandering, and the search for voluntary accidents.

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 3  Future

Material Futures explores the intersection of craft, science and technology encouraging students to look beyond existing boundaries to anticipate future needs, desires, and challenges. Taking materiality as the starting point of the design process we integrate high and low technological materials and processes, pursuing relevant applications across fashion, architecture, product design, and communication & critical design. Observing and analysing how we live today allows us to consider how we can live better tomorrow. Considering the current and future context of design decisions is core to our ethos, combining social, political and economic inquiry to inform future, sustainable design applications.

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 4  LUCY + JORGE ORTA

Lucy Orta (b. Sutton Coldfield, UK, 1966) and Jorge Orta (b. Rosario, Argentina, 1953) founded Studio Orta in 1991. Lucy + Jorge Orta’s collaborative practice focuses on the social and ecological factors of environmental sustainability to realise major bodies of work employing drawing, sculpture, installation, object making, couture, painting and silkscreen printing, as well staging workshops, ephemeral interventions and performances. Orta’s most emblematic series are: Refuge Wear and Body Architecture: portable minimum habitats bridging architecture and dress; HortiRecycling: the food chain in global and local contexts; 70 x 7 The Meal: the ritual of dining and its role in community networking; Nexus Architecture: alternative modes of establishing the social link; The Gift: a metaphor for the heart and the biomedical ethics of organ donation; OrtaWater and Clouds: water scarcity, a vital natural resource and the problems arising from pollution and corporate control; Antarctica: international human rights and freer international migration; and Amazonia: the value of the natural environment to our daily lives and to our survival.

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 5  Mary katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou was born in Athens in 1983, to an interior designer mother and a father who worked in textile design. Having developed an appreciation of applied design from an early age, she moved to America to study for a BA in Architecture at the Rhode Island school of design, before transferring to Central Saint Martins to complete her BA degree in textile design. Graduating from her BA in 2005, Katrantzou shifted her direction from textile design to womenswear with a focus on print. When studying at Central Saint Martin’s, she became interested in the way that printed textiles can change the shape of a woman’s body and went on to graduate in MA Fashion from Central Saint Martins with distinction.

 

 

“Print can be as definitive as a cut or a drape and allows a woman to filter beauty found in design, in a subversive way. All my prints are constructed through digital technology. Digital print allows me to experiment with print in a way that fine art and other methods could not. It opens up a huge spectrum for possibility; I can create possibility out of impossibility, surrealism out of realism and both vice versa.” says Mary.

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 7  Issey Miake

The ISSEY MIYAKE Collection is founded in the philosophy of clothing made from “a Piece of Cloth,” a concept which explores not only the relationship between the body and clothing, but also the space that is born between them. The philosophy has evolved and grown as have Miyake’s interests always founded in innovative clothing combined with modern research and development. The Collection made its debut in New York in 1971. Since the Autumn/Winter 1973 collection it has been shown in Paris. The ISSEY MIYAKE Men’s Collection was first presented as a section within Fall/Winter 1976 Women’s Collection; it has been shown as an independent line since 1978.


Issey Miyake and his design team have been experimenting with and refining their pleating technique since 1988. The groundbreaking method - by which pleats are applied after the fabric is cut and sewn - is a revolutionary departure from traditional process. The first examples were presented in the ISSEY MIYAKE Spring/Summer 1989 collection. Since that time, the process has been refined and expanded to include basic items such as t-shirts. In 1993, the culmination of Miyake’s research, PLEATS PLEASE ISSEY MIYAKE, made its debut as elegant yet versatile clothing that offered its wearer both comfort as well beauty. The clothing is easy to care for, store, and travel with; and offers a choice of colors, patterns and shapes that make full use of the lightweight polyester knitted fabric. PLEATS PLEASE ISSEY MIYAKE is a premier example of “clothing as a product,” something that responds to the evolving needs of a demanding lifestyle and continues to please and delight its wearers.

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 4  Olga de Amaral

Colombian artist Olga de Amaral sculpts space and form with light. She has created architectural tapestries, realizing her dream to "turn textiles into golden surfaces of light." By using woven elements of linen painted with gesso and earth toned pigments, as well as gold or silver leaf, the artist overlaps, weaves and twists strands of these fibers to bring forth the interplay of darkness and light. Her process establishes rich terrains of mood and emotion that evoke not only the intimacy of personal experience, but also the associations to a vaster realm outside of ourselves - the Colombian landscape mingled with its native architecture, pre-Columbian textiles, Indian basketry, gold artifacts, ornamentation of colonial Catholic Churches, and abstract geometries. Over the past 10 years, major exhibitions of de Amaral's work have been held in museums in Colombia, Argentina, Peru, Japan, Germany, France and the United States. Her work is included in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art — where she recently gave a lecture on her work, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Museum of Art and Design in New York, The Art Institute of Chicago, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville in Paris and the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.Literature Olga de Amaral, el manto de la memoria. Zona Ediciones, Bogota, Colombia. 2000; 224 pages, full color reproductions.

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F a s h i o n a n d t e x t i l e ( p a r t I )

 

Today we started with a very interesting exercise, we had some objects with sculptural shapes like glasses, rings, boxes... And we had to link them together with thread. It was a kind of introduction to fashion, which consistes in joining pieces of fabric together in order to have a beautiful sculptural garment. It was a team work and our group was given plastic glasses. To be efficient each of us worked on a glass (but we informed each other of our ideas before so that everyone agreed) and we joined them all at the end. We thought that our "sculpture" looked like Brancusi's famous Infinite column. undefined Brancusi Infinit Column 1938 We thought for aesthetic reasons that we should attach it to the celling. Our column was then is suspension. This little exercise was good because like so many others before it was spontaneous. I feel that within this instantaneity, this spontaneousness our work gained a certain abstraction and that this abstraction left a lot of space to our imagination. That is a creative process that I have enjoyed throughout out all the project we mad so far. We then had to draw our new object using different techniques. We used continuous line, blind drawing (my to favorite) and other techniques such as using out two hands, limited time, switching mediums... Then, when we had build a base, a sort of preparative work we where given acetate paper and asked to create a print out of it that will then be projected on to a wall. I decided to work with a variety of thread, tape, and paper to give my fabric some texture. I enjoyed the whole process of the creation.

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