A C T I

P R O C E S S

C U T T I N G 

cutting  (ktng)

adj.
1. Capable of or designed for incising, shearing, 
or severing: a cutting tool.
2. Sharply penetrating; piercing: a cutting wind.
3. Injuring or capable of injuring the feelings 
of others: a cutting remark. 
Tate Modern 
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 1  The Tate Modern

Observations:

- Mouvement

- Agressivity

- Gesture

- Emptiness

- Leaving a mark

- Organic

Reflexive Journal : The Museum 

Click here                     

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 3  In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium.

From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

 Found here 

 

Matisse said :

"Only what I created after the illness constitutes my real self: free, liberated.”

“painting with scissors.”

 

 Found here 

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 2  Picaso

 

Observations:

Cubism implies cutting and collage. If Picasso and Braques the two inventors of colage  are also the inovator of Cubism it isn't a coincidence.

Cubism is the cutting of multiple points of vue wich are then put together,assembled like a collage. This process creates decomposed and recomposed figures (see the two pictures).

 

 

As Kahnweiler saw it, Cubism signified the opening up of closed form by the “re-presentation” of the form of objects and their position in space instead of their imitation through illusionistic means; and the analytic process of fracturing objects and space, light and shadow, and even colour was likened by Apollinaire to the way in which the surgeon dissects a cadaver.

 

 

As Kahnweiler saw it, Cubism signified the opening up of closed form by the “re-presentation” of the form of objects and their position in space instead of their imitation through illusionistic means; and the analytic process of fracturing objects and space, light and shadow, and even colour was likened by Apollinaire to the way in which the surgeon dissects a cadaver.

 

 Found here 

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